About Japanese Sake II

Hello!

The sake I bought this time is called Yamahōshi (山法師) and it is said to be the driest sake in Japan.

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But what does dry mean when it comes to Japanese sake?? In order to find out, I also bought Tatenogawa (楯野川), another sake made in the same region, Yamagata Prefecture.

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Hiroshi and I drank together and tried to compare the two types of sake. Let’s say that Yamahōshi has a dry, astringent aftertaste, while Tatenogawa has a soft taste, a taste that you can only find in a popular sake!

Apparently, the dryness of white wine is not the same as the dryness of sake.

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Wanting to make a thorough comparison, we brought in some sashimi as well, but we ended up getting drunk, and we both agreed on this conclusion:

Tatenogawa is very good!

…a pretty useless report.

Being amateurs, we surrendered in front of the popular sake. Yamahōshi has such a complex, difficult to describe, philosophical taste; it’s not for everyone, but who likes it really likes it.

If you are trying sake for the first time, I recommend you Tatenogawa; if you had sake several times, Yamahōshi. They are both tasty and you can buy them for a rather reasonable price.

Please, give them a try!